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Historic Royal Palaces – Great Masters by Cole & Son

I am so excited to be able to share with you the latest collection by Cole & Son who pay homage to the master artisans, craftsmen and celebrated monarchs who shaped the six iconic royal residences which are now cared for by Historic Royal Palaces.


I have selected just a few of my personal favourites from this exquisite collection and talk you through each design and why it's one of my favourites.


Verdure Tapestry



Taken from the Flemish tradition of vast tapestry-weaving, Verdure Tapestry is inspired by a 17th century work which is currently displayed within the King’s Presence Chamber of Kensington Palace. Its verdant, pictorial scene pays homage to the richly woven, intricate tapestries that were known as 'the mobile frescoes of the North'. These impressive pieces of woven art were a canvas for master weavers’ imaginations, each landscape lavish in fanciful trees and foliage, without the traditional perspective constraints of figurative or narrative tapestries. Translated here by Cole & Son into a sumptuous panel scene, Verdure Tapestry is full of life with its abundance of rich flora and fauna.

What's not to love about this show stopper, it has alot to offer from it's opulent colours to being a talking point amongst your family and friends. I can't see me ever getting bored of this design, and it will be on display inside my shop in Sheffield.


Verrio Sky



Combining both elements of Verrio Mirror’s trompe l’oeil pillars and arches, with Fresco Sky’s ethereal skyscape, Verrio Sky is a decadent fresco-style design showing the breadth of its inspiration’s talent. The design house creative team of Cole & Son studied the soft light and architectural precision of Antonio Verrio’s masterful hand to produce this striking design.

This design will also feature inside my shop as it's sky effect background offers a sense of calm and tranquility . This would look great maybe in a Drawing room or if you have an office at home.


Court Embroidery



Delicately hand-painted to emulate silken hand stitches, Court Embroidery is inspired by an early 19th century waistcoat from the Royal Ceremonial Dress Collection. This courtier’s garment is a beautiful example of a time when gentlemen’s clothing was as fine, if not more elaborate, than those of a lady. Court dress was a signifier of opulence, wealth and position. Trimmings, embellishment and embroidery were often employed to provide a dazzlingly rich effect, with exquisite needlework and sumptuous fabric admired by both male and female members of court.

This would look amazing in a few places like in a hallway as pictured above or a bedroom or even a downstairs toilet.


King's Argent



The grand baroque-style extension of Hampton Court Palace was commissioned by William III and Mary II towards the end of the 17th century to rival the great palaces of Europe. Opulence was at the heart of baroque design, with mirrors being a great luxury and a symbol of extreme wealth. King’s Argent is a reflection of this extravagant addition to the palace, a detailed series of silvered mirrored tiles covered in shadowy leaves and flower heads, its delicate etchings adding to the stately grandeur of Hampton Court’s ceremonial rooms.

For me, this is for those of you that like to add a bit of glam to your home, and why not!


If you would like to order a free sample of any of the designs above please visit my online store.





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